the same as you.
October 2nd
12:11 AM

What does your soul look like?

slow groove…groove on…

October 1st
11:48 PM
Via
northmagneticpole:

Nathaniel Russell

northmagneticpole:

Nathaniel Russell

11:02 PM
Via
ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?
What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.
Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.
In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”
As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.
“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”
Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique →

ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?


What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.

Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”

As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.

“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”

Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique

10:02 PM
Via
laura-berger:

Impermanence 
A new painting for my exhibition that opens this Friday at Hazel Chicago.  1902 W Montrose, 6-9 pm.  Showing through October 31st.  Hope to see you!
Please email me if you’d like to see an exhibition catalog:: laurageorge04[at]gmail.com

laura-berger:

Impermanence 

A new painting for my exhibition that opens this Friday at Hazel Chicago.  1902 W Montrose, 6-9 pm.  Showing through October 31st.  Hope to see you!

Please email me if you’d like to see an exhibition catalog:: laurageorge04[at]gmail.com

10:00 PM
Via
September 30th
10:53 PM
Via
10:20 PM
Via
wizrrd:

These Madagascar Day geckos are all over my hotel in Hawaii. I love it

wizrrd:

These Madagascar Day geckos are all over my hotel in Hawaii. I love it

9:49 PM

tispy is the best way to write papers.

the only way.